Monthly Archives: September 2015

Learn from the Presidential Debates

Tis the season for some folly – i.e., the presidential debates have only just begun. Those of us tuned in for some or all of the show are looking for information or entertainment or both. If you run a business, I would suggest that viewing can also offer an education in interpersonal communications.

Just like the general population, some political candidates are naturally outgoing, at ease as the life of any party. Some are naturally thoughtful, not particularly loud but, as with the EF Hutton of old, when they talk, people listen. Others are naturally contentious, reveling in a good fight more than a civil exchange of ideas.

The truth is that many of the voting public want a president who blends all these personality characteristics appropriately, depending on the circumstances. But that’s a discussion for a future blog.

When it comes to debating, each participant must consider how well their natural behavioral tendencies will serve them. They will become a chameleon during the debate if and when they believe something other than their natural approach is required.

So, how is this educational to you?

Watch a few debates. Note which participants seem to be naturally aggressive and which do not. Note who comes across as thoughtful and prepared, and who does not. Compare the candidate who thinks well on their feet and moves smoothly with the ebb and flow of the discussion, with the one who appears to be cautious and a bit awkward when the subject changes.

The contrasts I’m raising are in no way intended to imply that any one trait is preferable to another in a President of the United States. Again, that’s a topic for another day.

But, if you take the opportunity to relate your debate observations to your own behavior in your organization, it should be educational. You’ll recognize more clearly your own style. You’ll recognize that you are more credible and more relaxed and generally more effective when operating within your natural style. (Because you’ll notice that anyone assuming the role of chameleon in the debate – i.e., stretching to be somebody they are not – turns an unattractive shade of green or brown.) You’ll realize that when you feel forced to modify your style significantly, your stress goes up and you become less effective interpersonally. Or worse, you embarrass yourself.

Next time you watch a debate, notice how uncomfortable an aggressive candidate appears to be when they attempt to become thoughtful and low key. Notice how uncomfortable a contemplative candidate becomes when they attempt to respond to confrontation with confrontation. And make a note to self that you are much more authentic when you are able to stick close to your natural style in every business situation.

Long in the Tooth

Sometimes the primary job of the CEO is coachingI’m not all-in anymore. That was the latest expression from a business owner who is pondering his changing role in his business. Other lips have delivered the same message in different code: I’m not sure what my job is anymore or I seem to be focused more on my personal vision than on my business vision.

Business owners almost invariably reach a point where they are confounded about their own role in the business and not sure what to do about it. Occasionally this is an indication that it’s time to sell or give away the business. More often, however, the owner is not interested in retiring just yet – only in finding his or her appropriate role in a business that has evolved over time.

In the great American pastime of baseball, there is a parallel. As an example, Andres Blanco currently plays for the Philadelphia Phillies and is all of 31 years old. In baseball years, he’s getting a little long in the tooth. The Phillies are in a rebuilding year, and Andres is a utility infielder. The future of the team consists of younger infielders who are destined to eventually become starters at second base, shortstop or third base, if they aren’t already playing that role. Blanco plays all three positions well, but in this rebuilding season is playing an even more important role. He’s become a model for the younger players on how to conduct oneself as a major leaguer. He models and advises the younger players on everything from the hard work required for game preparation to handling post-game interviews.

That’s the parallel to the “I’m not all-in anymore” business owner. At some point, the greatest contribution you can make to your own business is to develop the younger talent. It’s to model appropriate behaviors, coach the younger employees who lack experience, and encourage those who are still learning and making mistakes. That often is a full time job for the long-in-the-tooth business owner. But even if it’s only half a job, that’s fine. Do it well, and spend the other 50% on the golf course or fly fishing or drag racing or traveling.

Andres Blanco, the mentor, will likely become a coach when he retires from playing. Coaching baseball, or coaching your younger employees…neither is a bad life.