Monthly Archives: October 2017

Fresh Eyes

FreshEyesRichard Nixon was early in his first term, the Detroit Tigers had won the World Series for their first time since 1945, and Fred Borch was CEO of the General Electric Company, when I came out of college and began a 17-year career with GE, a historically strong company, often emulated by other enterprises around the world. The company continued to build on that reputation well into the twenty-first century.

Few manmade constructs last forever. GE’s CEO for the past 16 years has just retired, and the new CEO is wasting no time making changes. Investors have been disappointed with GE earnings and strategies and performance for some time. They now have fresh eyes at the top and new directions and predictions of performance are being established.

My emotional ties to GE (even though I left prior to the turn of the century (how depressing does that sound?) have drawn my attention to their current circumstances. Having spent the final 15 years of my working life as a business coach, and having worked with a number of outstanding entrepreneurs, and having witnessed the making of numerous business decisions of consequence, GE’s current situation reminds me of the power of Fresh Eyes.

If you have operated your own business for a few years, you may or may not realize the upside potential of Fresh Eyes. Ingrained leadership can be very bright, very competent, very hardworking, but locked into a particular view of the business, its employees, its customers, and all its other stakeholders. Fresh Eyes can provide a path to improved performance, particularly when nothing the current leadership is doing appears to be working.

My suggestion is not that you look for a CEO to take your place (unless you are ready to exit your business), not that you get an eye exam and new prescription glasses, but that you seek the advice of trusted outsiders. One of the most effective approaches – in my experience – is to become part of a peer advisory board, a group of non-competing business owners, a collection of openminded leaders, an assemblage of generous entrepreneurs. Once you’ve become a board member, use the board effectively: do your homework; keep your board members advised of your business progress; seek their counsel prior to making key decisions.

You’re still the decider. But your decisions can benefit from the clarity of vision and variety of alternatives identified by Fresh Eyes.

As always, your thoughts are welcome and you may share them below.

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The Sweet Sonorous Sound of My Name

MyNameIsWe were on Delta Flight 1833, connecting through Salt Lake City on our way to Cincinnati. It was the usual, my hips wedged into the 12-inch wide coach seat, the lady in front of me comfortably reclined into my lap, my lower back and legs already beginning to cramp, only sixty minutes into the 3-1/2 hour flight.

“Would you like a beverage, Mr. Roof?”

Say what!? Had that soft-spoken flight attendant just called me by name? I was almost speechless, a little tongue-tied, but managed to blurt, “Fresca please, no ice.” While she was turned away pouring my drink, I smiled and searched through the gray cells that were still searchable, trying to recall the last time a flight attendant had called me by name. Ever? I think so, once, when my flights were so botched that the airline bumped me into a first class seat to try to make amends. But I have generally grazed in the cattle car over the years, silently enduring a mental fog, where even I am unable to remember my name.

My wife had mentioned that she had read somewhere that Delta was on a customer service kick of some sort when I noted that the gate agent had thanked me by name as we boarded both planes on this particular trip, but then he was looking at my boarding pass. The flight attendant had to be looking at a seating chart between filling orders. Suddenly she reappeared with my drink, looked me in the eye while handing the cup to me and said, “Thank you. We appreciate you being a Delta frequent flyer.”

Delta is a huge company, operating more than 5400 flights per day, in business since 1928, eighty thousand employees worldwide, $40 billion in total revenues. Their planes, like those of most competitors, are uncomfortable. Outside of their aircraft, their primary customer contact occurs in airports, venues that rank right up there with dental offices in terms of customer destination preferences.

So, if you’re giant Delta, how do you grow your business? It seems they have opted to make their customer interactions more friendly, a little more intimate. Probably won’t cost much, and it just might work.

What type of business will not benefit by being more friendly, more personal, more intentional in dealing with customers? Hard to think of one, isn’t it?

Maybe you’ve been in business a long time, or maybe you just started your business. Or maybe you don’t really have your own business, but you are a key cog in the organization that employs you. Have you or your business done anything different in the last year to endear yourself to your customers? Calling your customer by name may be a small deal to you, a regular part of your business operations. But it’s a big deal for a major airline. What would be a big deal for you in your industry, a big deal that wouldn’t cost a lot of money?

As always, your comments are welcome below.