Tag Archives: Business Owner

Leadership Lessons from 2018

Leadership requires emotional maturity as well as intelligence.Have you noticed how valuable it can be to simply pay attention to what’s going on? As leader of your company, you can benefit from critically observing the good, the bad, and the ugly emanating from leaders in the limelight. It is my nature to highlight the positive lessons you can absorb from others. I’m going to deviate from that nature today. I simply cannot ignore the barrage of clear lessons of what not to do that have come our way recently. Here are my top picks:

  • Publicly belittling your perceived foes using childish language – not good.
  • Publicly berating key members of your management team – poison.
  • Falling in love with a project and refusing to let it die, even in the face of new developments that would compel a dispassionate observer to change course – not smart.

You wouldn’t be running an organization if you weren’t at least sensitive to these exhibitions of incompetence. Continue to observe what eventually comes from possessing healthy grey matter but lacking emotional maturity, and learn from it. 

Hold on! I almost forgot two of the most important lessons to be learned from last year.

  • Do not use social media of any type to communicate anything serious about your organization – totally inappropriate. 
  • Lying is bad form – period.
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Take Stock

Year-end summary; strategic plan; year in reviewAs a coach of entrepreneurs and small business owners, I’ve encouraged my clients to create a “Letter to Stakeholders” that concisely summarizes each year. The letter consists of three short paragraphs: highlights of accomplishments; comments on the disappointments or shortfalls; and a statement of the most important objectives for the upcoming year. More recently, I’ve broadened my recommendation to include additional lenses through which to view the past twelve months. 

One such lens is Personal Accomplishments, a list of personal milestones that don’t directly apply to your role leading your business. This is normally a short list – sometimes a single item. But that single item can be significant. 

Examples range from guitar lessons to starting a vegetable garden; from taking up cycling to becoming treasurer for your place of worship; from coaching your child’s little squirts team to learning to prepare Swedish meatballs. 

As with your Letter to Stakeholders, it’s worth taking the time to write down your personal accomplishment(s) and ponder them. It will not take you long to record them, and only a little longer to also record why each accomplishment is important.

The audience for whom you are writing is…you. The thinking that goes into your list creation will inspire your ongoing personal growth.

I’m still passionate about the value of your Letter to Stakeholders, but the Personal Accomplishments list can be just as powerful for a workaholic like you. It provides a reminder that you are more than your business. 

Dachshund Leadership Lesson

CEO Leadership, Motivation

Oscar following nose

Oscar is eleven-going-on-twelve, sweet of disposition, good with other dogs, tolerant of all people, and about as easy to lead as a chicken. We often walk the Indian Creek Trail just below our home, and I’ve finally decided to take him off the leash – to cease pulling him away from every malodorous scent, and to let him move along at his own pace while I walk ahead, stopping every few strides to encourage him to catch up.

During a recent meander with Oscar, thinking about how poorly I was performing as a leader of a dog, a book I read a few years back (Drive (by Daniel Pink), popped into my head. I remembered that at the heart of Pink’s book was the theory that, for work that requires any form of creativity, intrinsic motivation is far more effective than extrinsic motivation. He further argues that the three nutrients for intrinsically motivated work are autonomy, mastery and purpose.

Not surprisingly, research reveals that most of us really want a high degree of autonomy in our work. We don’t want to be told exactly what to do and how to do it and when to do it. We generally want to understand the desired result and then, after considering how other successful people have approached it, have the freedom to use our own thinking and skills to improve on that process. Taking Oscar off the leash gave him increased autonomy. He got a little better at moving down the trail, and our walking relationship became less antagonistic.

Most of us want to grow in the mastery of our work. This begins with mindset, a belief that we can get better. Mastery requires effort along with the realization that, no matter what the challenge, we can always get better. I’ve concluded that mastery is at the core of my disconnect with Oscar. He simply doesn’t see a reason to master trail hiking.

Finally, intrinsic motivation is enhanced when our work has purpose. Studies have shown that, when one’s job is intrinsically meaningful, the bouts of anxiety or depression are generally few or nonexistent. You can be the judge, but Oscar doesn’t look anxious or depressed to me.

OscarPortrait

Using Oscar as an example (which makes me shudder), one may conclude that, if the only goal is to avoid Oscar becoming depressed, then it doesn’t matter that my purpose (getting to the end of the trail and back) and his purpose (smelling every stick, leaf, bug, and rock) are not aligned. 

But these contrasting purposes are not quite what Pink had in mind. And while he may not argue for perfect alignment of purposes, he would certainly argue that he is using “purpose” in the sense of “meaningful”; that, while autonomy and mastery will foster intrinsic motivation, adding a higher purpose to the mix will inevitably optimize the results of that motivation. This third leg, the sincere belief that our work is, in some way, bigger than us, completes a strategic triad that undergirds the human behavior most employers are seeking.

So, as CEO, you may want to think through how your organization supports intrinsic motivation. And then, if you want a more complete view, ask your employees.

Gooch

AutoHoodUp

In the old days you could actually do something under your own hood.

He was 58 and I was 24. He was a senior application engineer in the Dallas office of GE’s Industrial Sales Division, and I was a neophyte sales engineer. We became fast friends.

With short cropped gray hair, straight and thin frame, squinty eyes above the ever-present cigarette, and the ability to focus like a laser on an electrical system challenge, Bob Gooch represented his employer well. He used his name as his calling card. “People just call me Gooch,” he would say. And they did. It was comfortable, and the name, the manner, and the intelligence drew our customers to him.

Gooch and I both had company cars. All expenses related to maintaining and driving the cars were paid by the company. Most employees with company cars took them to the dealer regularly for oil changes, lube jobs, and tuneups. Not Gooch. He preferred to do his own work.

Shortly after I met him, Gooch suggested I might want to join him on a Saturday morning and service my car while he was servicing his. I had done these tasks on my own car before and really had not planned to continue the practice with my company car. But I liked talking with Gooch and the offer sounded interesting, so I agreed. It went well, lots of good conversation while doing our own service work, and we saved ourselves the inconvenience of dropping our cars off for service someplace else. 

We continued our DIY car servicing on a regular schedule and one Saturday morning we ran into a problem. The details have faded from memory, but the essence was that we were attempting to remove a component under the hood of my car, and the bolted connections were so rusted we could not budge them. I was prepared to take it to the dealer and let them wrestle with this snake. Gooch commented something like, “You know, we can do this if we’re willing to spend the time.” He went on to explain that a little oil and a lot of time would probably work. So, we proceeded to squirt oil on the rusted threads approximately every 15 minutes. After waiting fifteen minutes we would apply the wrench, attempt to loosen the nuts and, failing that, apply more oil and wait another 15 minutes. We must have gone through that cycle for about two hours before the nuts finally broke free. In between nut-loosening attempts, we took our time fiddling with other minor maintenance issues, and talking about all things under the sun. At the end of the day I had learned a lesson of time and patience.

As CEO, you face a variety of difficult tasks continuously. Some are intellectually demanding, some emotionally demanding, some even physically demanding. But today I’m writing about those that are time and patience demanding…tasks like carefully reviewing that government contract, and the numerous detailed changes your attorney has recommended; challenges like researching and understanding the variety of benefit packages that you might offer your employees as you grow your organization; time drainers like preparing a few slides for that next strategic planning staff meeting – visuals that can make the meeting so much more productive than merely winging it, but that require the discipline to block off the time to ponder and prepare.

There’s the key – discipline. We’re not talking about lacking the ability to do something important. We’re talking about the willingness to invest the time and emotional energy into an important task that will take a chunk of your limited time.

I’ll bet you have an important challenge right now, one that you’ve set aside. You have other more interesting and less time-consuming projects you’re working on. That important one you filed in your “future” file may remain there indefinitely. 

Let this be your springboard to jump on it.

Competition

Competition within business organizations

Milo Competes at Lacrosse

Competition. Where does it fit in your company culture?

It might be helpful to step back a couple paces and consider where competition exists within organizations in a healthy, thriving American culture? How about on a sports team? Within the military? In school? Within a family? In a government organization?  A hospital? A medical research team?

Most reasonable people seem to conclude that competition is a good thing under certain circumstances and a bad thing under others. But the general concept is contentious, more so than in the past. And I have witnessed the swing of the pendulum over my lifetime, with an increasing number of people finding an increasing number of circumstances under which they believe competition is not good.

I began my business career with GE, and I was reminded of the competitiveness of that environment recently when I listened to a Freakonomics podcast in which Michael Dubner interviewed Jack Welch, retired CEO of GE. The following is a verbatim, unedited, transcript of one of the points that Welch made during that interview.

Look, differentiation is part of my whole belief in management. And treating everybody the same is ludicrous. And I don’t buy it. I don’t buy what people write about it. It’s not cruel and Darwinian and things like that, that people like to call it. A baseball team publishes every day the batting averages. And you don’t see the .180 hitter getting all the money, or all the raises. Now that’s the purest form. Athletics is the purest form of differentiation, because it’s public. Everybody understands it, the fans understand it, the people understand it. Big business is more subtle and it’s more qualitative. So the precision isn’t there to differentiate. So judgment’s important. But you don’t win with a gang of mediocre players in business or in baseball.

Welch believed and clearly still believes in “radical candor” when it comes to evaluating individual performance, and in rewarding the best performers while helping the worst performers find a different career.

Where do you stand on competition within a business organization? Is your position significantly different when it comes to non-business organizations or communities? Why not bring this up for discussion the next time you socialize with some of your business peers? Better yet, share your thoughts below.

Watch the Super Bowl and think about the other S-Word

CoachChalkboardYou’re a competitor, so there’s a good chance you’ll be watching the Super Bowl on Sunday. Can I get you to think “Strategy” while you’re watching? It will actually enhance your enjoyment of the game, and you can watch guilt-free because your CEO gray matter will be working on your business at the same time.

The yet-to-be-determined winner of the game has built a season based on effective strategies. I can guarantee you that they both had the same BHAG (Big Hairy Audacious Goal) in mind at the start of the season – to win the Super Bowl. Each team had a set of values and an effective team culture that they stuck with throughout the season. They studied and understood their opponents, and they had short-term goals (weekly) of defeating that week’s opponent. They established game plans for each game that included appropriate contingency plans. If we fall behind early, here’s what we’ll do. If we aren’t able to establish our running game in the first quarter, here’s what we’ll do in the second quarter. If our quarterback gets hurt, etc. In short, they built strategies for each aspect of the competitive environment, with detailed action plans that were subject to change as conditions warranted. And they’ve repeated that strategic planning process in preparation for this week’s big game.

So, as you watch the game Sunday, draw parallels with your business and its environment and the competition you face each week. Challenge yourself. Is your BHAG clear? Are your short term goals understood by your “players”? Have you taken the time to outline, in writing, the goals and action plans and individual responsibilities for the next quarter or for the entire year?

Enjoy the game. Allow it to provide motivation to define and communicate your business strategy.

Unwinding and Reloading

CEO Relaxation

Unwinding

Another Christmas, a New Year looming, much year-end wrap-up to be done. And it’s the best time to take stock.

But first, make sure you have allowed yourself to unwind. Everybody unwinds differently, and many CEOs don’t unwind the way normal people do. You know you, so allow yourself to unwind in your most effective way sometime before hitting full throttle again in January.

Now, about taking stock…

Separately from the unwinding, allow yourself a couple hours to review your business year. Although you may want to outline or create a detailed plan for the first quarter or even the entire year, delay that until you have answered the following questions to your own satisfaction:

What were our most significant accomplishments this year?
Did we make money? If yes, was it a fair return on our investment?
Are we generally headed in the right direction, toward my vision for the business?
Am I becoming more skillful? In what ways?
Am I having any fun?

Unwind, reload, launch into 2018.

Have a joyous holiday. May you be well and prosperous in the New Year.