Tag Archives: Business Planning

Your Black Labrador

oscarexposed

Oscar

Oscar, my black lab, looks a little different from most black labs. His legs are shorter, his fur is shorter, and his head is smaller – not to mention his entire body. But he’s a black lab because, where we have recently moved, everybody has a big dog, and many are black labs. So, he needs to be a black lab.

When we hike a trail with his new best friend, Delmar (who looks a lot closer to a black lab than Oscar), Oscar invests himself in the walk almost completely. He wants to keep up with Delmar. His short legs churn at blazing speed (OK, maybe not blazing, but faster than normal), constantly trying to catch up to Delmar. This attempt at speed is in dramatic contrast with a normal Oscar walk which is more of a saunter, a meandering, a sashaying, guided by his nose, and at a pace resembling that of the occasional slug he confronts on our garden path.

Oscar’s metamorphosis when walking with Delmar is not unlike some small businesses. When they get around larger businesses, they develop more of a spring in their step. Large customers, large suppliers, large potential investors, and large member companies in their peer advisory group can cause the business to step it up a notch.

As a result of hanging out with Delmar, Oscar is healthier and his self esteem is elevated. He’ll probably live longer because of his new friend. He dares to try new things (like actually getting close to the creek that runs along one of his favorite hiking trails).

If there’s a downside, it’s the potential for injury as he tries to keep up with the big dogs. He could experience a heart attack, or he could develop the confidence to leap into a fast moving stream that whisks him away prematurely to doggie heaven.

Business lessons? Acquiring large customers or large suppliers or large investors, or joining a business owner peer advisory group with some larger members can be helpful to your business growth, if you’re willing to run faster to make up for your shorter legs. While it’s OK to tell fellow business owners that you are running a $10 million business, even if the best year you’ve ever had was $7.8 million, do not let that bravado lead you into overburdening the business with debt, or seriously overcommitting to large customers.

One of your challenges as CEO is to balance your view of your business against reality. Dreaming of a bigger business can be the beginning of a true metamorphosis. Driving the business considerably faster than its current capabilities allow can lead to a bad ending. The best CEO is a balanced driver.

The Long and Winding Road

business planning

Indian Creek Trail – Hood River, OR

How does that Beatles song title grab you as a description of your business journey?

Earlier this year, my wife and I moved to a new state and a new home. The house itself is situated adjacent to the Indian Creek Trailhead. The first time we hiked this segment of the trail, I knew generally where it ended, but of course I had never actually made the journey. As we began our short expedition, certain attributes of the trail became evident. The path itself was dirt in some places, gravel in others, with various amounts of pine needles and leaves covering it (as well as an occasional bit of dog poop). It was a winding trail since it was following a creek, and our trek was compounded by many ups and downs. Seldom could we see more than a hundred feet of trail ahead.

I have had countless discussions with business owners regarding the relative merits of business planning. The winding road metaphor is a good one for arguing how much business planning is optimal. Any business journey is filled with twists and turns, hills and valleys, good footing and poor footing. The important thing is to determine the general direction you want to head. The planning process is paramount in establishing this destination or waypoint. It’s key to deciding major strategies for how you will move in the direction of your goals. But the unpredictable nature of the path itself renders detailed planning useless.

We’re just over  halfway through the calendar year. Summer is always a good time to review how you’ve handled the surprises of your snaking trail thus far, and to recalibrate your compass.

Creating positive change in an organization is one of the most difficult tasks facing a CEOYou don’t have to look far to find books or articles proclaiming how to accomplish effective organizational change.  Many of these are worthy of your attention.

But if you happen to be the proponent of an upcoming change for your business, you would best start preparing by engaging in some serious introspection. Let me explain my point using a very personal example.

My own personal vision and life circumstances have recently combined to cause a lot of introspection. My spouse and I are in the throes of planning our “next chapter”. It will involve substantial change. It has caused me to reflect on a handful of some of the most important changes I have experienced since birth. Here’s a recap, ultimately tied into a business lesson.

My personal journey down memory lane led me to conclude that some of the most memorable changes in my life occurred in my youth. Changes like being pushed from the nest into nursery school; or transitioning from elementary school to junior high, where we had to change classes multiple times each day; or graduating to high school where my sophomore class size was 1100 students; or saying goodbye to a large high school and hello to a small college; not to mention seven job changes and relocations within the first 17 years after college.

Now, after living in the same home for 29 years, change finally looms again. We have grown comfortable with our house, our neighborhood, our friends, our church, and our surroundings in general. But our children and grandchildren are on the other side of the continent. Emotion suggests that we stay where we are comfortable and buy lots of plane tickets to enjoy being with family multiple times a year. Yet logic relentlessly pushes for relocation closer to family.

At this moment, the concept of change is very real and very personal. I believe I’m in an appropriate frame of mind to understand how your employees might feel when you are bringing a major change to the business or to their role in the business. I believe the most important factors involved in the inherent resistance to change are:

  • The involuntary nature of most change, viewed from the perspective of an employee
  • The relative comfort of “the present”, again from the perspective of the employee

In my personal situation, our upcoming relocation is, in a sense, forced. It’s forced by our advancing age and the anticipation of the inevitable decline in health. This makes it difficult.

Since our present circumstances are comfortable, since it will be difficult to leave good friends and familiar surroundings, score another blow for difficult change.

However, the rest of the story is more important than these two realizations. The attraction of being a larger part of our children’s and grandchildren’s lives; of being more available to help out; of being present to celebrate birthdays and holidays; is strong. The attraction to get to know new territory, to get to make new friends, to prove that we remain vibrant and significant as we approach seven decades on the planet – this attraction to relocate a couple thousand miles and make a difference in new ways also imposes a seemingly magnetic pull. And the magnets enumerated are strong.

As a business owner who is leading change, you will be most successful if you can identify with those specific fears or perceived losses that make the change difficult for each individual employee.  Then, identify and clearly articulate the “magnets” associated with your proposed change. Feeling their pain and showing them the positive tradeoff of the change should be central to your change strategy.

Are You Asking the Right Questions?

2015 again holds a high degree of uncertainty for CEOs

Deja vu?

You’re racing to the end of another calendar year and, guess what?  For a CEO, this one ends just like the last!  Not the details, of course, but you’ve been here before when it comes to the overall uncertainty about the business environment.

The U.S. economy has experienced its fastest 6-months growth in the past ten years, and yet the rest of the world economy looks much less sanguine, and many are concerned about how this may affect the U.S. economy.

On the national political scene we will have both a Republican House and  a Republican Senate come the New Year, and yet the most credible voices are predicting that gridlock in Washington will continue.

Technology continues its relentless advance, providing new tools for operational efficiencies; and yet it simultaneously confounds and frustrates most of us when it comes to marketing and the “promise” of social media.

With regard to finance, the business bankers are speaking more sweetly, but their banks are still behaving like the man who offers you an umbrella when the sun is shining but can’t seem to find one for you when it’s raining.

This uncertainty is nothing new to you!  A CEO deals with it, planning for it and managing through it.  But the real rub for most CEOs is on the personal side.  With the holidays upon us, and with the end of another year at hand, I encourage you to ponder:

  • Are you having any fun?
  • Are you making money?
  • Are you becoming more skillful at something?
  • Are you generally headed toward your destination, toward your vision?

Underlying these questions is the really big one: “How ARE you??”  That is, how are you doing intellectually, physically, and spiritually?

Do yourself a favor. Find a few minutes, no later than January 1st, to answer this question, in writing:  Indeed, how the heck are you?

 

Specifically, address your intellectual state, physical state, and spiritual state.  Then commit to taking actions that will result in progress in one, two, or all three areas in 2015.  After you’ve done this, go back to those four questions regarding fun, money, skills, and vision, and take a crack at them. It’s a great way to clean out the cobwebs and launch your next twelve-month journey.

I wish you the very best in the New Year!

What if your car came without a dashboard?

Great CEOs have  identified their Key Performance Indicators and track them relentlessly.Are you a better driver because you can easily determine how fast you’re traveling, how much fuel remains, and what time it is? Are you more likely to safely reach your destination because you can readily see the compass direction of travel and because you’re immediately alerted to a loss of oil pressure or tire pressure?  Does the dashboard improve your overall ability to travel efficiently and effectively?  Would you be upset if the auto manufacturers decided to reduce the cost of their vehicles by eliminating all the instrumentation and alarm lights?

Now consider your business dashboard. Have you identified and do you regularly review your key business performance indicators (KPIs)?  Here’s why every CEO should:

  • Identifying your KPIs forces prioritization of data.  The total data available can be overwhelming and you have to keep your eyes on the road.
  • The correct KPIs provide a regular monitor of business historical performance, as well as the outlook for the short-term future. They enable you to stay on track.
  • The habit of routinely reviewing your dashboard (KPIs) creates a powerful sense of having your “arms around your business”, regardless of how well or how poorly the business is currently doing.
  • Your dashboard provides a jump start for when you need to:
    • Create a long range business plan
    • Create a marketing plan
    • Apply for a bank loan
    • Discuss the business with a potential investor
    • Interview a candidate for a key position
  • As a habit, your review of your KPIs is an excellent accountability tool for you personally as well as for your entire business.

You wouldn’t drive your car without a dashboard. Is it any less dangerous to drive your company without one?

Dismount!

Every CEO sometimes holds onto a bad idea too long.

Riding a Dead Horse (not really)

There are some subjects that are difficult to approach positively.  This seems to be one of them.

Every CEO occasionally finds himself or herself riding a dead horse.  It could be that new product program that is consistently delayed and where the projected cost to manufacture is much higher than the original estimate.  Or that new employee whose performance is so far below what you anticipated three months ago during the final interview.  Or it might even be your entire company.  Maybe you’re worn out, ready to move on, and have never really created the entity that you envisioned when you founded it.

Regardless of the situation, you feel the right decision in your gut.  Your gut understands that you are riding a dead horse and that the only appropriate next step is to dismount.

Contrary to my opening statement, this negative post really does have a silver lining.  Dismounting creates a better situation.  Killing the new product program frees up resources that can be more profitably applied elsewhere.  Terminating or reassigning the failing employee eliminates drag on the organization and allows the individual to find their true niche – either within or outside your organization.  Selling your company to a strategic buyer who has the resources or market position to make it a success is good for you, your employees, and probably the overall economy.

The timely dismount can be every bit as potent for your company as any new initiative might be.  So, how are your feet stuck in the stirrups?

Uniquely Yours

It’s not just lonely, but also unique at the top. You must hold yourself accountable for certain responsibilities that cannot be delegated to others. The challenge is that, if you’re like most CEOs, you also hold yourself accountable for many items that could indeed be delegated.

If you are buried in the weeds of your business 24/7, your business will eventually bury you. Yes, most CEOs must devote significant time to working within their business. But if you haven’t already developed the discipline of spending at least 2% of your time each month (about a half day) stepping back and working on your business, your business is likely to continue to run you rather than the other way around.

What are those unique accountabilities that only you can assume?

  1. Establish your vision of where the company needs to go, and communicate it clearly and frequently.
  2. Find and retain employees who can help get you there.
  3. Lead the creation and routine updating of company goals, strategies, and action plans that will help get you there.
  4. Protect the corporate assets (physical and financial) while making sure you are using them to help get you there.
  5. Assure that the various parts of the company are coordinated and working together to deliver customer value at a profit, and to help get you there.

In a sense, being CEO has a lot to do with attitude and perspective. Consciously accepting this higher level of accountability is a way of your ultimately exiting your business on your terms.

Why not keep score for a few months? Copy the list of accountabilities and keep them close by. Make a daily or weekly note of your estimated time spent in each of the five areas. Hold yourself accountable – or get somebody else to do so – for tracking how much time you actually spend on these important areas. Then make appropriate adjustments.