Tag Archives: Family Business

Competition

Competition within business organizations

Milo Competes at Lacrosse

Competition. Where does it fit in your company culture?

It might be helpful to step back a couple paces and consider where competition exists within organizations in a healthy, thriving American culture? How about on a sports team? Within the military? In school? Within a family? In a government organization?  A hospital? A medical research team?

Most reasonable people seem to conclude that competition is a good thing under certain circumstances and a bad thing under others. But the general concept is contentious, more so than in the past. And I have witnessed the swing of the pendulum over my lifetime, with an increasing number of people finding an increasing number of circumstances under which they believe competition is not good.

I began my business career with GE, and I was reminded of the competitiveness of that environment recently when I listened to a Freakonomics podcast in which Michael Dubner interviewed Jack Welch, retired CEO of GE. The following is a verbatim, unedited, transcript of one of the points that Welch made during that interview.

Look, differentiation is part of my whole belief in management. And treating everybody the same is ludicrous. And I don’t buy it. I don’t buy what people write about it. It’s not cruel and Darwinian and things like that, that people like to call it. A baseball team publishes every day the batting averages. And you don’t see the .180 hitter getting all the money, or all the raises. Now that’s the purest form. Athletics is the purest form of differentiation, because it’s public. Everybody understands it, the fans understand it, the people understand it. Big business is more subtle and it’s more qualitative. So the precision isn’t there to differentiate. So judgment’s important. But you don’t win with a gang of mediocre players in business or in baseball.

Welch believed and clearly still believes in “radical candor” when it comes to evaluating individual performance, and in rewarding the best performers while helping the worst performers find a different career.

Where do you stand on competition within a business organization? Is your position significantly different when it comes to non-business organizations or communities? Why not bring this up for discussion the next time you socialize with some of your business peers? Better yet, share your thoughts below.

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Long in the Tooth

Sometimes the primary job of the CEO is coachingI’m not all-in anymore. That was the latest expression from a business owner who is pondering his changing role in his business. Other lips have delivered the same message in different code: I’m not sure what my job is anymore or I seem to be focused more on my personal vision than on my business vision.

Business owners almost invariably reach a point where they are confounded about their own role in the business and not sure what to do about it. Occasionally this is an indication that it’s time to sell or give away the business. More often, however, the owner is not interested in retiring just yet – only in finding his or her appropriate role in a business that has evolved over time.

In the great American pastime of baseball, there is a parallel. As an example, Andres Blanco currently plays for the Philadelphia Phillies and is all of 31 years old. In baseball years, he’s getting a little long in the tooth. The Phillies are in a rebuilding year, and Andres is a utility infielder. The future of the team consists of younger infielders who are destined to eventually become starters at second base, shortstop or third base, if they aren’t already playing that role. Blanco plays all three positions well, but in this rebuilding season is playing an even more important role. He’s become a model for the younger players on how to conduct oneself as a major leaguer. He models and advises the younger players on everything from the hard work required for game preparation to handling post-game interviews.

That’s the parallel to the “I’m not all-in anymore” business owner. At some point, the greatest contribution you can make to your own business is to develop the younger talent. It’s to model appropriate behaviors, coach the younger employees who lack experience, and encourage those who are still learning and making mistakes. That often is a full time job for the long-in-the-tooth business owner. But even if it’s only half a job, that’s fine. Do it well, and spend the other 50% on the golf course or fly fishing or drag racing or traveling.

Andres Blanco, the mentor, will likely become a coach when he retires from playing. Coaching baseball, or coaching your younger employees…neither is a bad life.

Family Business Best Practices

The CEO of a family business must deal with an added layer of complexity to the challenges of running a successful enterprise.

Family Businessmen

I recently facilitated a meeting of five business owners, all of whom lead a business with other family members involved. They were gathered to share best (and worst) practices based on their own experiences. The discussion focused on bringing the next generation into the business, and preparing them to take the helm. Here are the most significant truths that emerged:

  • The next-generation family member should start out “mopping the floors”. They need to earn the respect of other employees.
  • Establish the discipline from Day One of differentiating between “talking business” as employer-employee, and “talking personal” as mother-son.
  • A young family member in their teens entering the business, even on a part time basis, creates special challenges. Their lack of real-world work experience makes it harder for them to understand the necessary separation between family and business relationships.
  • They need exposure, over time, to all areas of the business. Ascertain whether the organization can compensate for their weaknesses and allow them to play to their strengths if and when they assume the leadership position. Be willing to accept the fact that they may not be cut out to eventually run the business.
  • You must manage your expectations, which may be distorted because you are personally close to the family member. Allow them to surprise or disappoint you, and make necessary adjustments to your expectations and plans as they do.
  • Differentiate between compensation and business ownership. Compensate based on contribution to business results. Allocate ownership based on any family considerations you deem to be fair.

Running a business is challenging. Leading a family business adds another layer of complexity which only family business owners can fully appreciate.