Tag Archives: marketing

The Sweet Sonorous Sound of My Name

MyNameIsWe were on Delta Flight 1833, connecting through Salt Lake City on our way to Cincinnati. It was the usual, my hips wedged into the 12-inch wide coach seat, the lady in front of me comfortably reclined into my lap, my lower back and legs already beginning to cramp, only sixty minutes into the 3-1/2 hour flight.

“Would you like a beverage, Mr. Roof?”

Say what!? Had that soft-spoken flight attendant just called me by name? I was almost speechless, a little tongue-tied, but managed to blurt, “Fresca please, no ice.” While she was turned away pouring my drink, I smiled and searched through the gray cells that were still searchable, trying to recall the last time a flight attendant had called me by name. Ever? I think so, once, when my flights were so botched that the airline bumped me into a first class seat to try to make amends. But I have generally grazed in the cattle car over the years, silently enduring a mental fog, where even I am unable to remember my name.

My wife had mentioned that she had read somewhere that Delta was on a customer service kick of some sort when I noted that the gate agent had thanked me by name as we boarded both planes on this particular trip, but then he was looking at my boarding pass. The flight attendant had to be looking at a seating chart between filling orders. Suddenly she reappeared with my drink, looked me in the eye while handing the cup to me and said, “Thank you. We appreciate you being a Delta frequent flyer.”

Delta is a huge company, operating more than 5400 flights per day, in business since 1928, eighty thousand employees worldwide, $40 billion in total revenues. Their planes, like those of most competitors, are uncomfortable. Outside of their aircraft, their primary customer contact occurs in airports, venues that rank right up there with dental offices in terms of customer destination preferences.

So, if you’re giant Delta, how do you grow your business? It seems they have opted to make their customer interactions more friendly, a little more intimate. Probably won’t cost much, and it just might work.

What type of business will not benefit by being more friendly, more personal, more intentional in dealing with customers? Hard to think of one, isn’t it?

Maybe you’ve been in business a long time, or maybe you just started your business. Or maybe you don’t really have your own business, but you are a key cog in the organization that employs you. Have you or your business done anything different in the last year to endear yourself to your customers? Calling your customer by name may be a small deal to you, a regular part of your business operations. But it’s a big deal for a major airline. What would be a big deal for you in your industry, a big deal that wouldn’t cost a lot of money?

As always, your comments are welcome below.

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Analysis, Anxiety, Action

Yacht“He seemed to understand my business, but…”

I was sitting with a CEO of a $4 million business several months ago. Call him Jay. Like many small business owners looking for continued growth, Jay was wrestling with a thorny decision. He had contracted with Kevin (not his real name), a marketing consultant, to develop a comprehensive marketing plan for the business. At the time of our discussion, Kevin had just presented a plan that consisted mainly of an analysis of the business’s current situation: markets served and unserved, competitive strengths and weaknesses, market position, and so forth. Jay found the data informative, but kept pushing Kevin for detailed recommendations – suggestions for reasonable sales growth goals and action steps both short- and long-term to achieve those goals. Kevin seemed to be dodging that question, instead hinting that Jay could contract with him on a retainer basis to guide the implementation of the plan over the upcoming months. Jay was wary.

This situation is not unusual. It’s not really a communication problem as much as a perception problem. Both Jay and Kevin are focused on “results”. However, Jay’s mindset is that of an entrepreneur; Kevin’s is that of an analyst. For Jay, achieving consistent growth is the result. For Kevin, defining the market and competitive situation is the result.

Stated simply, Jay wants to be reasonably confident that “If I do this, then I’ll achieve that.”

This difference in perspective is why consultants have such a challenge selling small-to-midsize businesses on their services. When they fail to secure a contract, they chalk it up to the assumption that the entrepreneur didn’t really have the money to spend anyway. But they are often mistaken, and they’re missing an opportunity to participate in this market.

In Jay’s most optimistic view, Kevin has opened the gate to the lock that can elevate his yacht to the next level. Now Jay wants Kevin in the boat, as his “marketing first mate”, for the next part of the journey.

A key to unlocking the door to a win-win consulting agreement is the willingness of the consultant to be paid on a sliding scale, proportional to the successful achievement of longer term goals.

Agree or disagree?

 

Can you hear them now?

The CEO is ultimately responsible for the creation of efficient processes for the business.

Airborne

I find myself on an airplane a few times each year, and I’m always critically observing the many processes involved in air travel.  Everything from my online purchase of the ticket to the claiming of my luggage.  And it always occurs to me that my clients are examining my processes in a similar, critical manner.

If you gave each of your customers/clients a grade card to fill out, how would they rate your company at each touch point in their relationship with you?  Why not at least create the grade card, listing all those processes that involve interaction with your customer?  Then, if you have the courage, start handing them out and asking for feedback.

Constant Connection

Cell phone can hinder CEO productivity.

Cute, but distracting

Near the start of a recent peer advisory board meeting, the CEO to my right was noticeably jittery.  I asked him if everything was OK, and he explained that he had decided to leave his cell phone in the car for the morning.  He believed it would be a good idea to get away from it for several hours to devote his full attention to the meeting, but he was definitely showing some physical signs of withdrawal. Continue reading

Your Business Should Be Like Spaghetti Sauce

Product Customization

Spaghetti Sauce

Have you discovered your formula for success in business?  Does it include focusing your resources and efforts on being truly outstanding in your industry? If so, great!  However…because we humans are so complex, and because you are doing whatever you do for other humans, being outstanding in your line of work is not enough.

Author and speaker Malcolm Gladwell describes the success of Howard Moskowitz in helping Prego spaghetti sauce achieve leading market share in the U.S.  The secret was not in developing the single, best-tasting sauce on the planet.  It was in realizing that tastes vary from individual to individual.  Prego’s success came from having over 30 different sauces so that each consumer could discover one that delighted.

No matter what product or service you offer and deliver, Continue reading